Sunday, September 21, 2008

Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos Finally Gets a Clue

As some of you may have noticed in the past, I'm not the biggest fan of Colombia's Darío Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos. From his position on the Ecclesia Dei commisison, he's consistently been the hierarchy's biggest booster of the revival of the Tridentine Mass, of Pope Benedict's misguided Summorum Pontificum, and of reconciliation between the Church and the Lefebvrites. It sounds like even Darío is starting to figure out that the overture to this group and their sympathizers, which in large part lay behind the motivation for the Motu Proprio, was a blunder and only made them feel more emboldened. No surprise there. Millions of Catholics could have told him what he is begining to discover. As always, I try to reconsider when appropriate, and give credit where credit is due.

From Cindy Wooden's article in the Boston Pilot: Cardinal: Some not satisfied even after pope’s Tridentine Mass decree
Rather than being grateful, some people have reacted to Pope Benedict XVI's wider permission for the celebration of the Tridentine Mass with further demands, said Cardinal Dario Castrillon Hoyos.

The cardinal, president of the Pontifical Commission "Ecclesia Dei," spoke Sept. 16 at a conference marking the first anniversary of "Summorum Pontificum," the document by which Pope Benedict expanded access to the Tridentine rite, the Mass rite used before the Second Vatican Council.

Cardinal Castrillon, whose commission works with communities using the old rite, said his office continues to receive letters requesting the Tridentine rite be used not just at one Mass a week but at every Mass, and that such Masses be available not just at one church in a town but at every church.

He said he even got a letter demanding that Rome's Basilica of St. Mary Major be dedicated exclusively to the celebration of the Tridentine-rite Mass.

Such people, he said, are "insatiable, incredible."

"They do not know the harm they are doing," Cardinal Castrillon said, adding that when the Vatican does not accept their demands immediately "they go directly to the Internet" and post their complaints.
You don't say! The rest of us had scarcely noticed...
The process of reconciliation broke down in late June when Bishop Bernard Fellay, superior of the Society of St. Pius X and one of the four bishops ordained by Archbishop Lefebvre, failed to meet four conditions posed by Cardinal Castrillon for moving the process forward.

"The Eucharist should never become a point of contrast and a point of separation," Cardinal Castrillon said at the Sept. 16 conference. "What is more important: the mystery of God who becomes bread or the language by which we celebrate the mystery?"

7 comments:

Brother Charles said...

I have mixed feelings about Summorum Pontificum. I had never been to the old Mass before the document came out, but now I've been attending just to learn it, in case I'm called upon to celebrate it by the faithful, who, at least in my reading of the document, are now allowed to request it. My Latin is pretty good and I can sing, so it's only a matter of time.

As I've attended the "extraordinary form" each Sunday afternoon for a couple of months, there are aspects I've come to appreciate both in the liturgy and in the assembly. But I've also come to better understand why it must have been such a liberation to receive the reformed liturgy.

I do think it naive to have thought that a prayerful or liturgical preference for the "Tridentine" Mass was the essence of the thought-world of the Lefebvrites and their likes and sympathizers. Of course it goes much deeper.

I think their internal dissatisfaction will ultimately be increased by the document because Summorum Pontificum is fundamentally post-modern. Ever since the Gregorian reform, the Roman church has expended a lot of energy and theological reflection in trying to achieve unity and uniformity in the liturgical lex orandi. To now say that there are multiple expressions of a single lex orandi, well, to me that's a post-modern stance. The restorationists don't want post-modern, but pre-modern. In simpler terms, it's not that they want to be free to pray in a certain way, but they want everyone else to do it too.

Garpu said...

The restorationists don't want post-modern, but pre-modern. In simpler terms, it's not that they want to be free to pray in a certain way, but they want everyone else to do it too.

A part of me wonders if the Cura was just not that aware of the social aspects around those types, or if it was deliberately being dense. It's not like you can't spend five minutes on google and not find a host of screeds.

crystal said...

I've never been to a Latin Mass, only seen it (I guess?) in old movies, but it seems both beautiful and remote.

Steve Bogner said...

You know, in a way, it seems to me that church leaders are getting subjected to some things they've never had to deal with: an active, vocal laity and religious community that knows how to publicize and lobby for the changes they feel the church needs. Are the Lefebvrites and Voice of the Faithful all that different in lobbying for changes they feel the church needs to make?

It seems everyone has their agenda to promote. It's not such a bad thing, to be actively engaged and work for changes you feel passionate about. But how often do we look deeper into ourselves to get a clearer picture of what's driving us to work for these righteous causes?

The Cardinal is getting an education in all this, it seems.

Jeff said...

Hi Brother Charles,

First of all, I want to thank you for sticking with me. Thanks for being patient with my sarcasm and frustration. I know it doesn't always make for the most enjoyable and edifying reading. I appreciate your forebearance.

To now say that there are multiple expressions of a single lex orandi, well, to me that's a post-modern stance. The restorationists don't want post-modern, but pre-modern. In simpler terms, it's not that they want to be free to pray in a certain way, but they want everyone else to do it too.

I see what you are saying. I've always tended to think of the standardization to the Tridentine Rite as a consequence of the post-Trent situation (rather than the Gregorian), when unity and doctrinal clarity was being stressed over the value of the diversity of multiple rites that still existed, but I guess I can see why some are issuing a a call for doctrinal clarity again. Personally, I'd like to see more diversity in the rites, but one of the problems with SP as I see it is that it was a concession to the party that believed the least in liturgical diversity. They took it as a sign that the pendulum was swinging in their direction, and became even more intransigent.

Jen,

That's true. I'm wondering if they've got their ear more to the ground these days, listening to the grass-roots more than they used to. You made a point once that I very much agree with. It would be nice if we could find a way to free the Tridentine Rite from all of the pre-conciliar nostalgia and politics that have grown up around it.


Crystal,

I remember attending the Latin Mass when I was a kid, and we went to one in upstate New York about 10 years ago. One thing that I recall that was common to both eras - With the priest's back turned I could hardly hear a word of what was being said. I don't care much for it myself, but I'm told it can be celebrated with great beauty.

Hey Bogs,

Good to see you posting again. Missed you.

Are the Lefebvrites and Voice of the Faithful all that different in lobbying for changes they feel the church needs to make?

Lobbying... That's an interesting way to put it and very apt, I think. The papacy is almost coming to be looked at as if was an executive function like the presidency. Paul VI distrusts Opus Dei, has no use for the Lefebvrites, and pushes the "Novus Ordo"... John Paul II loves Opus Dei, disciplines the Lefebvrites, distrusts VOTF, and continues with the VII liturgical reforms... Benedict has no real preference for Opus Dei over the other conservative movements, wants very little to do with VOTF, thinks Paul VI made a mistake with the Tridentine Mass, and looks to traditionalist groups like the FSSP to be a sparkplug for a new "creative minority"... It's starting to remind me of political campaigns. "I don't like what your pope did, my pope will se things to right, etc.., etc..." That of course, brings up your question. What do we see motivating and driving us when we look deeper within?

cowboyangel said...

Such people, he said, are "insatiable, incredible."

Could he really see no signs of this before? Why would that be?

Jeff said...

I think maybe he could. Maybe he thought of the concession of the Motu Proprio as a "put up now or shut up" kind of thing.